Category Archives: Archives Month

Hometown Heroes: How the People of Ohio Made a Difference in their Communities

It’s October and you know what that means- it’s American Archives Month! This year’s annual SOA poster to celebrate the event in Ohio recognizes “hometown heroes” who have made a difference in their communities and the world. Ten photos were chosen as winners but only a selection were included in the final poster. You can read the stories behind all ten winning images below. Congratulations to the winners and please consider sharing something from your own collection when the call goes out for next year’s poster.

Bowling Green State University Center for Archival Collections 

Ella P. Stewart (1893-1987) was among the first practicing African American woman pharmacists, a civil rights and women’s rights activist, and a respected community leader in Toledo, Ohio.  She was elected president of the Ohio Association of Colored Women in 1944 and served as president of the National Association of Colored Women from 1948-1952.  In 1952 she was also chosen to be a delegate to the International Conference of Women of the World, and in 1963 was appointed commissioner of the United Nations Education Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).  The Ella P. Stewart Academy for Girls in Toledo is named in her honor.

Case Western Reserve University Archives

Frances Payne Bolton reviews a Negro Nursing Unit, ca. 1940-1945.

Frances Payne Bolton was the first woman representative from Ohio in Congress. A particular interest of hers was nursing. She provided funds for the School of Nursing at Western Reserve University (which was named in her honor in 1935).

Among her accomplishments in representing Ohio, she was the sponsor of The Bolton Act which opened up the nursing profession to all women. It created the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps.

Frederick C. Robbins in Italy during World War II. Ca. 1942 – 1945.

Dr. Robbins served in Italy and North Africa as Chief of the Virus and Rickettsial Disease Section of the 15th Medical General Laboratory. He received a Bronze Star and was discharged with the rank of Major.

In 1954 he received the Nobel Prize in Medicine with Drs. John F. Enders and Thomas H. Weller for their “discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue.” This research led to the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines.

He continued to work on eradicating polio throughout his life and continued to work on research in other diseases such as HIV/AIDS.

Infant Welfare Clinic, University Public Health Nursing District, ca. 1917—1929.

The Public Health Nursing Program at Western Reserve University provided training for student nurses in caring for the community.

Clark County Historical Society

Sully Jaymes was Springfield’s first African-American lawyer, opening his practice in 1903. He was one of Springfield’s most tireless activists for equal rights. Jaymes represented primarily black clients, including Richard Dixon, the lynching victim of the 1904 riot, and other African-Americans indicted in the race riots of 1906 and 1921. Jaymes offered his services free of charge if clients were unable to pay. His commitment to securing equal rights under the law for black people by far took precedence over money.

Mahoning Valley Historical Society

Harry Burt, inventor and manufacturer of the Good Humor ice cream bar of Youngstown, OH.  He also pioneered the use of an ice cream truck and the “Good Humor Man” uniformed delivery/salesman of the Good Humor ice cream.  The location for the invention of and first manufacture of the product is now our Tyler Mahoning Valley History Center.

Old Worthington Library

George C. Blake, a World War II veteran from Worthington, Ohio, was awarded the Silver Star Medal in 1945 for his courageous actions on December 9, 1944 near Norville Les Vic, France. As a Private First Class in the 761st Tank Battalion, he worked through the night under intense artillery and mortar fire to administer first aid and evacuate the wounded. His Silver Star Medal citation states, “Private First Class Blake’s courageous action and devotion to duty exemplifies the highest tradition of the Armed Forces.” The 761st Tank Battalion was the first African American tank unit of the United States Army; it was not until the Carter Administration that a Presidential Unit Citation was issued to the 761st for extraordinary heroism.

University of Akron

Photograph of C.W. Seiberling as Santa Claus, 1919.  C.W. Seiberling co-founded with his brother F.A. The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company in Akron, Ohio, which eventually created millions of jobs for people in Ohio and around the globe.  Known as “the heart” of the company and a pioneer in the rubber industry, he is best known for his philanthropic work.  C.W. Seiberling devoted countless hours and resources toward helping the under-privileged, especially children.  He was an ardent supporter and financer of the Edwin Shaw Sanatorium, Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron’s Community Chest, the YWCA, both Girl Scout and Boy Scout movements, and the Handicapped Action Group, and donated generously to numerous churches and civic organizations regardless of race, creed, or color.   Image from the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Records, The University of Akron, Archival Services.

Photograph of Mary Gladwin, ca. 1889.
Mary Gladwin of Akron, Ohio served as a nurse in the Spanish-American War, the Philippine insurrection, the Russo-Japanese War, and World War I, where she served as supervisor of nurses at the American Hospital in Belgrade, Serbia.  She also played a key role in the Red Cross relief efforts in Dayton during the 1913 flood.  Gladwin helped found the Summit County Chapter of the Red Cross and the Visiting Nurses Association in Akron.  She was the first woman awarded the Florence Nightingale Medal for Nursing and the School of Nursing building on The University of Akron campus is named in her honor.  Image from the Mary Gladwin Papers, The University of Akron, Archival Services.

University of Cincinnati

Theodore M. Berry was a pioneering civil rights activist and politician from Cincinnati, Ohio, who from the 1930s to the 1990s was instrumental in National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) litigation, federal civil rights administration, and civic participation. Berry attended the University of Cincinnati College of Law, and in 1939 was appointed as Assistant Prosecutor of Hamilton County, the first African American to hold the post. Berry was elected to Cincinnati City Council in 1965, and later served in the Johnson administration. On December 1, 1972, Berry was sworn in as Mayor, making Cincinnati history as the first African American to hold the position.

If you want to continue your Archives Month celebrations, use SOA’s Passport to the Past to find out more about historical organizations throughout the state and visit one near you!

Another October another American Archives Month!

As part of the annual celebration, SOA creates a poster every year to highlight items from collections around the state. This year’s theme was Ohio in World War I, to mark the 100th anniversary of United States involvement in the “War to End All Wars.” Out of the 21 institutions that submitted images for possible inclusion, a poll of SOA members selected six. Only three were included in the final poster, so we wanted to take this opportunity to share all of the winning images and their stories with you. Congratulations to all images chosen and keep an eye out for the call for submissions for next year’s poster!

Congregational Archives, Franciscan Sisters of the Poor, Cincinnati, OH
In 1918, after 46 years in the US, Sister Eutropia was required to register as an Alien Enemy Female. She had to carry her registration card at all times.

Franciscan Sisters Registration Card

Franciscan Sisters Registration Card

National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, OH
Female employees at the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company, Plant 1, Motor Department, July 1, 1918.

Dayton Wright Airplane Company, Plant 1, Motor Department, 1 July 1918.

Defiance College, Defiance, OH
Card advertising the Student Army Training Corps on the Defiance College campus, c. 1918.

Defiance Students Army Training Corps Card

Defiance Students Army Training Corps Card

Ohio Army National Guard, Columbus, OH
Chaplain John F. Herget serving ice cream to Soldiers of the 1st Infantry Regiment during training in Cincinnati, September 1917.

Ohio National Guard members being served ice cream

Chaplain John F. Herget serving ice cream to Ohio National Guard Soldiers

Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH
Photograph of 21,000 soldiers who were stationed at Camp Sherman in Chillicothe, Ohio, during World War I standing in formation to make the shape of President Woodrow Wilson’s head. In the upper right-hand corner can be seen the tents and buildings of the camp.

Soldiers in Formation as Woodrow Wilson's Head

Soldiers stationed at Camp Sherman in standing in formation as the shape of President Woodrow Wilson’s head

Mary E. Gladwin Papers, University of Akron Archival Services of University Libraries, Akron, OH

Akron nurse and University of Akron graduate Mary E. Gladwin (back row, center) poses with nurses at the American Red Cross Field Hospital in Belgrade, Serbia during World War I—the only Red Cross hospital then located in a combat zone—where she helped care for over 9,000 soldiers.

Akron Gladwin with Nurses in Serbia

Akron Gladwin with Nurses in Serbia

With your Archives Month celebrations wrapped up, don’t forget to check out SOA’s Passport to the Past, it’s a great tool to learn more about historical organizations throughout the state.

DELAWARE COUNTY AND VICINITY ARCHIVES CRAWL 2017

October is American Archives Month – an opportunity to raise awareness about the value of archives. Delaware County, Ohio area repositories are sponsoring a month long October Archives Crawl event. Each of the host repositories has its own unique collection full of interesting pieces of local history. Take this opportunity to visit some of these repositories and learn about the information they preserve.

The goal of the Archives Crawl is to visit as many of the participating repositories as possible during the month of October and have each of them stamp your passport. Be sure to visit the Delaware County Records Center website and/or social media page for more details. Crawlers who visit at least five participating repositories could win a gift bag of items donated by each repository.

Passports can be obtained at all of the participating repositories except for the Ohio Fallen Heroes Memorial starting October 1, 2017. Passports will be due November 1, 2017 by 8:30am to determine gift bag winners.

Participating Repositories:
Beeghly Library, Ohio Wesleyan University
Big Walnut Area Historical Society/Myers Inn Museum
Community Library, Sunbury
Cryder Research Library of the Delaware County Historical Society
Delaware County District Library/Main Branch
Delaware County Genealogical Society
Delaware County Records Center
Gallant Farm Preservation Parks of Delaware County
Harlem Township/Harlem Township Heritage Inc.
Morrow County Genealogical Society
Powell Liberty Historical Society
Stratford Ecological Center
The Ohio Fallen Heroes Memorial
Wornstaff Memorial Library

“I Found It in the Archives” 2017 Voting Begins Today, August 14th

The 2017 state-wide “I Found it in the Archives” contest features winning essays from two institutions: The Clark County Historical Society and the Ohio History Connection

Anne Strupp and Janet Peterson - Entrants in the "I Found It in the Archives" 2017 Contest

Anne Strupp and Janet Peterson – Entrants in the “I Found It in the Archives” 2017 Contest

Read the 2017 “I Found it in the Archives” state finalist essays on the “I Found it in the Archives” Contest Entries page and vote for your favorite in the side navigation of any page on the SOA website.

If viewing the contest on a mobile device, please scroll down to the bottom of the page to place your vote.

Voting begins August 14, 2017 and ends August 31, 2017.

The “I Found it in the Archives” state winner will be featured during the SOA fall meeting, held in partnership with the Ohio Local History Alliance October 2017 in Dublin, Ohio.

Keep a lookout for more information about SOA’s fall meeting on the SOA website.

Celebrate Archives Month by Honoring the Accomplishments of an Ohio Archival Institution

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board Achievement Award recognizes significant
accomplishments in preserving and improving access to historical records, in any format, by
an Ohio archival institution.

All Ohio institutions responsible for archival records that provide public access to at least a
portion of their collections are eligible. Eligible accomplishments include recent special
projects or on-going programs that:

  • build significant collections
  • implement successful preservation strategies
  • enhance access to archives
  • develop effective digitization programs

Preference will be given to projects or programs that can be adapted for use by other
institutions.

Because the award recognizes institutional achievements, individuals are not eligible.
Departments employing members of OHRAB are not eligible, but other departments in their
institutions are eligible.

Nominating letters should be no longer than two pages, 12-pt, single spaced, describing the
institution’s program/project along with its goals, accomplishments, and significance. Each
must include the nominee’s institutional name along with a contact person’s name, mailing
and email addresses, and phone number.

Send nominations via email or U.S. mail to:

Pari Swift
Senior Records Manager
Ohio Attorney General’s Office
30 East Broad Street, 23rd Floor
Columbus, OH 43215
Pari.Swift@OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov

Nominations must be received by October 7, 2016.
Self-nominations are encouraged.

Questions? Contact Pari Swift at Pari.Swift@OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov or 614-466-1356

“I Found It in the Archives” 2016 Voting Begins Today, August 15th

The 2016 state-wide “I Found it in the Archives” contest features winning essays from three institutions: Oberlin College Archives/Oberlin Heritage Center, Greene County Archives, and the Clark County Historical Society.

Read the 2016 “I Found it in the Archives” state finalist essays on the “I Found it in the Archives” Contest Entries page and vote for your favorite in the side navigation of any page on the SOA website.

If viewing the contest on a mobile device, please scroll down to the bottom of the page to place your vote.

Voting begins August 15, 2016 and ends August 31, 2016.

The “I Found it in the Archives” state winner will be featured during the SOA fall meeting, held in partnership with the Ohio Local History Alliance October 7, 2016 in Dublin, Ohio. Keep a lookout for more information about SOA’s fall meeting on the SOA website.

“I Found It in the Archives” 2016 Voting Begins August 15th

The 2016 state-wide “I Found it in the Archives” contest features winning essays from three institutions: Oberlin College Archives/Oberlin Heritage Center, Greene County Archives, and the Clark County Historical Society.

Read the 2016 “I Found it in the Archives” state finalist essays on the “I Found it in the Archives” Contest Entries page and vote for your favorite in the side navigation of any page on the SOA website. If viewing the contest on a mobile device, please scroll down to the bottom of the page to place your vote. Voting begins August 15, 2016 and ends August 31, 2016.

The “I Found it in the Archives” state winner will be featured during the SOA fall meeting, held in partnership with the Ohio Local History Alliance October 7, 2016 in Dublin, Ohio. Keep a lookout for more information about SOA’s fall meeting on the SOA website.

“I Found It In the Archives” 2015 Ohio State-wide Competition Results

Aaron Buckles is the winner of the I Found it in the Archives contest for his essay which received 39% of the total 109 votes. Aaron will be a guest at the Ohio Local History Alliance/Society of Ohio Archivists Fall Meeting on October 2, 2015 and will share more background about his essay in the “I Found it in the Archives” session following Friday’s luncheon.

Thanks to the three contestants who shared personal stories about the discoveries they made using historical records found in archival collections at the Clark County Historical Society, the Greene County Archives and the Ohio History Connection. Thank you to everyone who voted for their favorite entry and shared this opportunity with family and friends.

“I Found It in the Archives” 2015 Voting Begins August 17th

The 2015 state-wide “I Found it in the Archives” contest features winning essays from three institutions: Clark County Historical Society, Greene County Archives, and the Ohio History Connection. Read the 2015 “I Found it in the Archives” state finalist essays on the “I Found it in the Archives” Contest Entries page and vote for your favorite in the side navigation of any page on the SOA website. If viewing the contest on a mobile device, please scroll down to the bottom of the page to place your vote. Voting begins August 17, 2015 and ends August 30, 2015.

The “I Found it in the Archives” state winner will be featured during the SOA fall meeting, held in partnership with the Ohio Local History Alliance, on October 2, 2015. Keep a lookout for more information about SOA’s fall meeting on the SOA website.